Plans for New Plants

How are you starting new plants for the your garden/ give as gifts/ sell  for fund raising events?

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Comments: 12
  • #1

    Bernie (Wednesday, 04 March 2015 09:30)

    I found starting new plants from cuttings a faster method to reach a mature plant. However using seeds is a better means to add new and unusual plants to your collection. I have a greenhouse and a basement with assorted lights . I like to hear your suggestions how I should use my facilities.

  • #2

    Bernie (Friday, 13 March 2015)

    Attention : Growers who use seeds to start new plants. Consider ordering the bulletin which you will find in our book listings.

    STARTING SEEDS INDOORS by Ann Reilly. Storey
    Publishing Bulletin. 32 pages, pap. ($3.95). Starting seeds, special germination, planting times.

  • #3

    Thomas Eckert (Thursday, 20 August 2015 14:23)

    Starting new plants from seed is ok but reproduction from cuttings produce an exact new plant from the host plant. This does not always happen with seeds. Also belonging to groups that have plant raffles or are swapping plants is a good way to increasing your plant varieties, just check them for insect and disease problems.

  • #4

    Bernie (Saturday, 12 September 2015 09:30)

    Summer is coming to an end. If you had your plants out doors the past months now is the time to start new plants once you cut them back. Over grown plants are a problem to maintain and they take up too much valuable room in the greenhouse. Plus it is good to have a back up plant in case the stock plant will die. Fellow gardeners like exchanging plants and it is a good way to learn about different plant families. So start propagating the cuttings.

  • #5

    Bernie (Saturday, 26 September 2015 10:08)

    Consider sharing cuttings from your over grown plants with other members. NOTE: list your plants on our Facebook page so you can add a photo and information.

  • #6

    Tom Eckert (Friday, 13 November 2015 08:06)

    We enjoy having an HGA chapter locally. At our meetings members bring in some of their excess plants for the raffle table. At 4 chances for a dollar, it is a good way to pick up new plants for your collection.
    Our local chapter is the Central PA Chapter, Camp Hill, PA. Contact June Eckert at tjghg@verizon.net if you would like to attend a meeting. Guests and the public are always welcome.

  • #7

    Carol Stiff (Monday, 15 August 2016 00:04)

    How many chapters of HGA exist? Is there one in Washington state? How do you start one? Thanks. I am new so apologies for dumb questions..........carol

  • #8

    Tom Eckert (Thursday, 18 August 2016 09:10)

    There are no HGA Chapter's in Washington state. Chapter formation is easy, but it does takes some dedication. I can provide information to you. Email tjghg@verizon.net and request a copy.
    Thanks for the question.

  • #9

    Garrett Waddell (Thursday, 02 February 2017 04:48)


    Peculiar article, just what I was looking for.

  • #10

    Tom Eckert (Monday, 07 August 2017 12:41)

    The HGA is planning to add a "New Plant Feature" to the HGA magazine. You can submit a picture(s) and growing information for this feature. Email tjghg@verizon.net with your submissions. Thanks

  • #11

    Ken Mencel (Monday, 09 October 2017 20:34)

    I am looking through the Magazine and trying to remember if there was an article on growing Geraniums in my greenhouse during winter months? I have gone through the magazines on file but have seen scented ones but I thought I saw the Red variety- basic Geranium but not sure??

    thanks, Ken

  • #12

    Jim Guinn (Sunday, 10 December 2017 08:46)

    A couple of years back I started with a lot of seeds and flats of zinnias, cosmos, black-eyed susans and coneflowers. While this year, I'll start another round of zinnias and cosmos, my blackeyed susans and coneflowers are big enough to divide. I also purchased some milk weed seeds. I'll get them going in the greenhouse and then move them outside. I want to attract more butterflies. They love the flowers, but the milkweed will provide a host plant for the monarch butterflies. I live in a rural area, so my extras I set out front on our stone wall with a "free" sign. They get snatched up fast, and I'm glad others can use and enjoy them.

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